What the temperature parameters, humidity and maximum runs are for the floating cork floors?

 I also wonder what the temperature parameters are for the floating cork floors.

ICork Floor

11:50 AM

Do you mean as “living conditions” or “shipping conditions?

Visitor 67918507

11:50 AM

for living conditions. I’m looking for flooring for a vacation home with winter temp set at 55 degrees F

ICork Floor

11:51 AM

The “55 F” would be the MINIMUM required to maintain warranty.

ICork Floor

11:52 AM

Technically these floors can handle minus temperatures…but they “age”.

Visitor 67918507

11:53 AM

We’ve been keeping the house at 55 in the winter for the last 20 years or so. I don’t expect that to change. But I’m hoping to put in flooring that will last another 30 years. Would we start to see gapping between floating tiles at 55F?

ICork Floor

11:54 AM

Gapping relies on humidity as well as overall living conditions.

Applying the 2 coats of polyurethane at time of install will help reduce or stop the likelihood of gapping.

In a home that allows temps to dip to 55F, a “30-year floor” may be can to achieve. A cork floor will do better than any other indoor flooring because cork stable cell structure. 

Visitor 67918507

11:55 AM

It’s a lake house where we keep a dehumidifier running in the basement through the summer. But nevertheless, being near a lake it is humid in the summer.

ICork Floor

11:55 AM

And that’s not just with cork. This goes for all flooring types.

Visitor 67918507

11:55 AM

Yes, that’s what I am running into.

ICork Floor

11:55 AM

The gapping is also determined by how many “pinch points’ you have (door ways, walk ways, breeze ways, etc). The fewer the pinch points the fewer problems with gapping.

Visitor 67918507

11:56 AM

It’s a very open layout, so I’m guessing minimal pinch points.

ICork Floor

11:56 AM

The world of flooring has a minimum living standard that anchors ALL indoor warranties: 65F – 85F; Humidity 40%-65% (or even worse).

ICork Floor

11:57 AM

Cork floating floors have MAXIMUM runs it can handle. An open layout can run into more problems with floating than a small, narrow space.

Maximum run = 30 ft.

Visitor 67918507

11:58 AM

The max width for this house would be 29ft.

ICork Floor

11:58 AM

I guess we are “good to go”.

Cork will expand and contract (over 25ft span) of 1 INCH every 6 months.

ICork Floor

11:59 AM

That means in your situation, you might want to add another 1/4″ at the wall ON TOP OF the required 1/2″ (you would have an expansion gap of 3/4″ at all walls and out croppings).

Visitor 67918507

12:00 PM

that’s a lot. how do people typically finish that?

ICork Floor

12:00 PM

Nice, big, fat baseboards…and adding shoe or quarter round moulding is needed for these larger spaces (like yours).

Cork is the most dynamic floor on the market.

ICork Floor

12:01 PM

A glue down tile would change most of those issues…but the install costs are astronomical.

Visitor 67918507

12:01 PM

hmmm, define “astronomical”? 😉

ICork Floor

12:02 PM

Cost of porcelain tile install = $3.5-$8/sf for LABOUR only…materials are extra.

Floating floor = $2- $4/sf install labour costs (depends on local employment rate for flooring installers).

Visitor 67918507

12:03 PM

ok, how hard is glue down to DIY? Is it something only a handful of initiates in a secret cult know how to do?

ICork Floor

12:03 PM

If you are smart, slow, patient, well read, and willing to take 3-4 days on your hands and knees…pretty easy.

ICork Floor

12:04 PM

A well trained cork flooring installer can lay 300sf of glue down cork in a day. A “bad” laminate installer can lay 600-700sf of floating floor per day.

Subfloor preparation is the first 2 days of work with a glue down floor. This also adds materials, machine rentals and time to a glue down install.

Visitor 67918507

12:07 PM

And you say that a glue down installation will help with the humidity and temperature variations I’m dealing with in this house?

ICork Floor

12:07 PM

It is possible…but not probable. It depends on your conditions that are causing the issues. What are you seeing with the floors you have now?

Visitor 67918507

12:08 PM

We currently have carpet and old sheet vinyl in the kitchen and bathrooms. So just shear wear, no other issues

ICork Floor

12:09 PM

Cork glue down tiles require PRISTINE subfloor conditions. That means the carpet could be “hiding” some cheap OSB or particle board…that would have to come out/be replaced with “good” plywood (the expensive stuff). The Vinyl would have to come up and the subfloor inspected and then repaired/replaced for a glue down.

ICork Floor

12:10 PM

Technically a floating floor will be floating over anything hard and flat. It doesn’t need “pristine” it just needs hard and flat.

Visitor 67918507

12:11 PM

Ok, I’ll have to think about the various pros and cons. But I really do appreciate your time and help thinking things through.

ICork Floor

12:12 PM

If you need a quick fix = floating floor. If you MUST HAVE 30 year floor, then the glue down will be the better thing that would come close…but humidity is an issue with the adhesives.

A floating floor, properly maintained, should get you 30 years. A glue down tile can be used in bathrooms. A floating can go anywhere else.

Visitor 67918507

12:13 PM

And from what I read on the website, the floating floor comes with poly coating but should have additional poly applied after install and then again, every few years?

ICork Floor

12:14 PM

With Loba AT ((advanced technology) = you may only need two coats after you install. With a traditional polyurethane finish, most cork floors need extra coats for about 5 years.

Visitor 67918507

12:16 PM

Thanks again for all your help. I will keep thinking on it. But this has helped a lot.

ICork Floor

12:16 PM

Have you received your samples? That might help.

Visitor 67918507

12:17 PM

No, I need to do that part

ICork Floor

12:17 PM

The icork website has the ability to create an account and order both floating and glue down samples.

ICork Floor

12:18 PM

My question to you (and your wallet) would be: How much time, money and effort am I willing to spend to achieve a glue down floor? Am I going to be disappointed if it fails due to moisture issues?

ICork Floor

12:19 PM

www.icorkfloor.com is the website is where you want to be for US clients.

Visitor 67918507

12:19 PM

Thanks!

Cork underlayment under hardwood flooring glue down or nail down for noise reduction

Visitor 59669639

9:43 AM

I am looking for cork underlayment to put under oak hardwood flooring

ICork Floor

9:44 AM

Cork works well with under a floating engineered or a glue down hardwood. It cannot be nailed in place.

Do you know your form of install?

Visitor 59669639

9:45 AM

it will be a nail down over plywood subfloor on 2×10 joists

ICork Floor

9:46 AM

I’m sorry but cork cannot be nailed into. You are better off with a fibrous underlay.

Visitor 59669639

9:46 AM

I have seen applications where it is nailed down. I know that this reduces the acoustical performance

ICork Floor

9:47 AM

Yes…people try…but

Nails through acoustic underlay = useless acoustic underlay.

Visitor 59669639

9:47 AM

oh, I see.

thank you for your help

ICork Floor

9:47 AM

Nails are tiny telephone wires = no noise reduction.

ICork Floor

9:48 AM

A glue down application is the go-to for acoustic install under hardwood.

This is called a double stick and it often doubles the cost of install…but you get all the benefits of acoustic underlay.

Visitor 59669639

9:48 AM

yes i understand. I will check on if I can glue down the hardwood

ICork Floor

9:49 AM

Most hardwoods have the ability for glue down…especially solid hardwood. Not all engineered hardwood has this option…but most do.

Visitor 59669639

9:49 AM

Ok, I have solid oak, made in canada. I will have a look at the process

Visitor 59669639

9:50 AM

thanks for your help.

ICork Floor

9:50 AM

I’m aware of the hardwoods. I hope you are able to find a solution.

be prepared for a double the cost of install.

Visitor 59669639

9:50 AM

thank you.

ICork Floor

9:50 AM

Have a good day.

Visitor 59669639

9:50 AM

I am installing myself.

so the cost is only in materials

ICork Floor

9:51 AM

The adhesive = $30-$50 per gallon with a spread rate of 50-80sf per gallon. You will do this twice…once of the cork and once for the hardwood.

Even trained hardwood installers can have issues with this install.

Visitor 59669639

9:52 AM

Ok, sounds good. I may have to stick with the nail down option. Thanks very much.

Take care, Ron

ICork Floor

TTFN.

 

Cork Glue down tiles or Cork floating flooring for my kitchen?

Visitor 54744071

4:47 PM

I’m planning on having cork for my kitchen floor. I have questions. This is a simple renovation using existing cabinets and new countertops and new appliances.

4:48 PM

ICork Floor

4:48 PM

Ok…what would you like to know?

Visitor 54744071

4:48 PM

Should the refrigerator be placed on top of the cork floor or will it sink? It is recessed in the wall.

ICork Floor

4:49 PM

Which type of cork are you looking at? Glue down or floating?

Visitor 54744071

4:49 PM

I’m not sure yet.

ICork Floor

4:49 PM

Appliances are installed on top of flooring.

Visitor 54744071

4:49 PM

Will it sink into the soft cork?

ICork Floor

4:49 PM

What type of flooring do you have?

Visitor 54744071

4:50 PM

Currently there is old parquet tile with subfloor underneath.

ICork Floor

4:50 PM

No. Cork is rigid enough to prevent that. It might “dimple” it by 1/64″…but other than that, it takes a huge amount of effort to get something to “sink” into cork.

Old Parquet = wood?

Visitor 54744071

4:50 PM

yes, wood

ICork Floor

4:50 PM

Are you planning to remove the parquet and lay new subfloor?

ICork Floor

4:51 PM

Have you received your samples yet?

Visitor 54744071

4:51 PM

I’m having a contractor do the renovation and he is bringing in a floor guy. The parquet will have to be removed to make it flush with the adjoin dining room which has oak flooring

ICork Floor

4:52 PM

This is where it gets interesting. Depending on how thick the parquet is, we might get away with a floating floor once the parquet is “popped” out.

If the parquet is low-end or thin, it might only give you 3/8″. That’s pretty thin.

Visitor 54744071

4:53 PM

I haven’t ordered samples yet from Forna. I think some old tiles are kicking around the garage.

ICork Floor

4:53 PM

If we pop off the parquet and clean up the subfloor a bit, a floating floor will go in same day.

If you want a glue down, then you have a day or two of floor prep before the tiles can be glued into place.

ICork Floor

4:54 PM

Please order samples from us. We have many new colours and several thicknesses of cork that no one else carries.

Visitor 54744071

4:54 PM

What’s your opinion on floating vs glue down?

ICork Floor

4:54 PM

Glue down = lovely with a LOVELY price tag (that’s tongue in cheek). Glue down = 2-3 times the INSTALLATION/labour costs of a floating floor. The choice comes down to “money”.

ICork Floor

4:55 PM

Our Canadians clients usually work with floating floors.

Visitor 54744071

4:55 PM

I’ve got about 150 square feet of flooring. What sort of $ difference should I expect for the finished floor?

ICork Floor

4:56 PM

My US clients usually want the glue down and DAM THE CONSIQUENCES!

Visitor 54744071

4:57 PM

Hmmm. I wonder about the actual cost of one vs the other.

ICork Floor

4:57 PM

If your subfloor is PERFECT…the price for glue down = DOUBLE the cost of a floating floor. If you need subfloor work then it can add another $1-$2/sf just to fix the subfloor.

The MATERIALS are going to be almost the same (about $1/sf difference to purchase). The LABOUR is another thing.

ICork Floor

4:58 PM

The cost of installing a floating cork floor = $2-$3/sf. A glue down = $4-$10/sf.

Visitor 54744071

4:58 PM

Does the glue down really take 10 days to cure before you can safely use the floor?

ICork Floor

4:58 PM

10 days is a bit much…and “walking’ is different than “full use”.

ICork Floor

4:59 PM

A glue down tile will take NOTHING less than 3 days before you can “walk” on it.

Full use = 5 days after the final coat of polyurethane is applied…this polyurethane is required for floating floor as well because it is in a kitchen.

Visitor 54744071

4:59 PM

So am I correct that the stove refrigerator and washer and dryer (all three are in recessed areas) go into place after the sealant is cured?

ICork Floor

5:00 PM

Yes…”full use” = 5 days after the final coat of Loba 2K Supra At is applied to the floor = 5 day cure time.

For a hardwood floor finish, 5 days is VERY FAST…it’s all about perfective. I’ve seen oil/solvent based finishes take 21 days to cure…some are as much as 30 days.

Visitor 54744071

5:01 PM

It seems like the floating floor may be a more practical option.

ICork Floor

5:01 PM

Once the parquet is popped off and the glue is sanded down a bit, a cork floating floor can be installed straight over top…no other requirements (assuming the subfloor is “flat enough”).

Visitor 54744071

5:02 PM

Nothing in my house is square or easy. I’m sure some prep will be needed.

ICork Floor

5:03 PM

The cork floating floor is then lightly sanded (high grit paper…like washing a child’s face) washed (damp water wet cloth) and allowed to dry (usually over night…but 1-2 hours can be enough) and the first coat of poly is put down. Then 4-5 hours later the second coat is put down.

ICork Floor

5:05 PM

After the second coat you can use the floor in “stocking feet” inside of 5 hours. Shoes are allowed after 24 hours. Full use = 5 days (move the furniture back in). Check out ‘Glide-N-Guard’ appliance rails at Home Depot or Amazon…they prevent damage when moving appliances into and out of their recesses.

Visitor 54744071

5:06 PM

Do both types of floors come in the shape of planks?

ICork Floor

5:07 PM

A cork glue down floor will require that new underlayment be installed (you can’t have old glue in place…the cork won’t stick to old glue). The subfloor is sanded and then everything is patched with cement. Allowed to dry and then sanded again. now you begin to glue. Glue must “cure” x 24 hours (no walking). Light sand, wipe down, allow to dry, and then first coat of poly is put down. (same procedure as floating).

ICork Floor

5:08 PM

The cork glue down comes in 1ft x 2ft tiles. The “floating floors” come in planks.

Do you mean “bevelled” edge when you describe “planks”?

Visitor 54744071

5:09 PM

I don’t want beveled edges in the kitchen. I thought a plank might look like wood floor planks.

ICork Floor

5:10 PM

“plank” to us simply means “rigid” like a plank or board.

If you want “wood look” we have “Fusion cork” that looks identical to wood.

Visitor 54744071

5:11 PM

I like the cork look – salami, silver birch, autumn leaves or something like that.

ICork Floor

5:12 PM

Then feel free to ask for samples. The Salami and Silver Birch both come in floating and 2 thicknesses of glue down. The Autumn Leaves comes in ½” (12mm) Luxury floating floor planks.

Visitor 54744071

5:12 PM

What size are the floating planks?

ICork Floor

5:13 PM

12mm thick planks: 30cm x 90 cm

ICork Floor

5:17 PM

The 12mm planks have a TOTAL cork amount of 6mm (3mm top layer and 3mm underlay). The 10mm planks have a total of 4mm cork (2.5mm top layer and 1.5mm underlay). The 12mm luxury plank is a significant step up from the.

ICork Floor

5:18 PM

Everyone else on the market are making their floors THINNER (10.5mm and 9.5mm are now common). We decided to go in the opposite direction. This sets us apart.

ICork Floor

5:23 PM

If the pattern exists in the thickness that you like, you are welcome to choose it. If it does not exist in the thickness you want (some people only want the 12mm) then it might take a while for us to get that product in (we are talking years…not months).

Which patterns were you hoping to see?

Visitor 54744071

5:23 PM

12mm Leather and Autumn Leaves.

Visitor 54744071

5:26 PM

Salami, Silver Birch, Logan Autumn Leaves

ICork Floor

5:27 PM

Please order samples at www.icorkfloor.com 

Visitor 54744071

5:28 PM

Okay. is there anything else I should know?

ICork Floor

5:29 PM

Ask for 3mm and 6mm cork underlay. These are often used to “even out” slightly wobbly subfloors. But for you that means you will not get a height match to your oak. Again, this is why you ask for the samples. You can “play” with floor heights using samples and underlay together.

ICork Floor

5:30 PM

As for “flush”…you probably won’t achieve “flush”. A few mm of height difference is easily covered up by uneven T-mouldings. Get the floor you like and then worry about transitions.

Visitor 54744071

5:34 PM

By T molding do you mean the threshold strip? Right now it is oak and there is already a height difference between the kitchen and the dining room and another difference between the dining room and the study which was an addition and has a different floor.

ICork Floor

5:35 PM

Yes…the official name = T-moulding or T-transition strips. Often called “thresholds” when used in doorways.

Visitor 54744071

5:35 PM

ahaa!

ICork Floor

5:39 PM

Must dash. I was off work 40 minutes ago. Please send us an email if you have any more questions.

Visitor 54744071

5:39 PM

Thanks you!Bye

Visitor 54744071

5:39 PM

That was very helpful – thanks!

ICork Floor

5:40 PM

Your welcome…have fun shopping with the samples;-)

silver birch forna cork floor kitchen design environmentally friendly floorings

silver birch forna cork floor kitchen design environmentally friendly floorings

Can cork flooring be used over a heated floor?

Visitor 40616863
1:53 PM
Just want to confirm that cork flooring can be used over a heated floor.
1:53 PM
ICork Floor
1:54 PM
We allow our cork flooring to be used over in-floor radiant heat that is “hydronic” or “forced air”.
What type of in-floor heating do you have?
Visitor 40616863
1:54 PM
It will be the electric heated matts
ICork Floor
1:55 PM
We prefer not to see our cork tiles/floating floor planks installed over electric matts. They have a long history of over heating = causes damage to adhesives/wood floors.
Where are you planning to install the matts? Kitchen, bathrooms?
Visitor 40616863
1:57 PM
No — It’s a old sunroom. I thought I’d asked earlier but perhaps didn’t clarify enough. It has ceramic tile now and the matts will go on that and then the floating cork. Advise?
ICork Floor
1:58 PM
This would be an EXTREMELY technical/expensive installation. It woud be cheaper/easier to remove the tile, install cork floating flooring and then add cheap baseboard heaters. The cork will become the insulation/warmth you are hoping for from the electric matts.
ICork Floor
1:59 PM
To get this to work, you would need to SINK the tiles in cement, lay the matts/mesh, and then SINK them in cement as well (about an inch) and then we can look at floating a floor over the radiant heat matts.
Visitor 40616863
2:00 PM
OK — I really appreciate the info and glad we clarified the situation. I am assuming I can still install the cork over the ceramic floor if I don’t put in the heated floor? Ripping up this ceramic is very expensive and messy.
ICork Floor
2:01 PM
Technically the floating floor can be installed over the tiles…SO LONG AS IT IS FLAT and EVEN (that means you need to get rid of grout lines AND smooth out the floor). I’ve seen it done. The owners all complained that the cork floor was bouncing and sounded “hollow”. This is because ceramic tiles are uneven.
ICork Floor
2:02 PM
I’ve seen contractors SAND DOWN ceramic tile and then fill the grout with concrete (sink it in cement) and that has worked. It was more expensive than removing the tiles…but it worked.
ICork Floor
2:03 PM
The going rate to remove tile (in my area) = $1-$2/sf.
Visitor 40616863
2:03 PM
Floor is flat and in great shape. Is it possible to get this exchange sent to me in email so I can show my contractor?
ICork Floor
2:04 PM
The “flat” means it has to be within the flat allowance: 3mm over 3ft (this causes the “hollow” sound) or for the BEST POSSIBLE option: 3mm over 10ft (floor no longer sounds “hollow” nor does it bounce). Subfloor prep is EVERYTHING.
I can send a transcript to your email.
Have you received samples?
Visitor 40616863
2:06 PM
That would be great. I had firiend who had this same tile removed and it took a jackhammer and made a huge mess despite elaborate screening and other measures. I did get the samples and really like the Walnut Burlwood.
ICork Floor
2:07 PM
The Walnut Burlwood is STUNNING! How big is your project and I can get a basic quote to you. And yes…jackhammers are needed to deal with ceramic tiles…this is normal.
Visitor 40616863

tasmanian burl forna cork floor laundry room with concrete wall

2:09 PM
You guys have already sent an estimate and the tiles aren’t expensive. i just need to figure out about the heat so a transcript would be great. Thank you so much.
ICork Floor
2:10 PM
The radiant heating systems are often more expensive than a nice baseboard heater. The cork acts as the “keep my feet and legs warm” product as well as insulating. It is cheaper to heat a space from INSIDE the space when using cork. If you try to heat “through” cork you will find it takes more energy (read: more expensive) to get the room up to temperature.

Great. Was rereading our earlier discussion. Assuming I opt for another heating solution is there a problem putting the floating tile over the ceramic tile. There was some dialog but wasn’t clear if it only pertained to putting the floating tile, heat and ceramic or just floating and ceramic. Can you clarify? Am I better off looking at tiles that apply directly? Love the blue granite but . . .

ICork Floor

3:32 PM

The biggest problem you have = ceramic tiles. This is the biggest hurdle you face.

ICork Floor

3:33 PM

The next “issue” is the want to use electric mats. These mats have a history of being expensive (both to purchase and install) and can have failure rates. The REALLY GOOD ONES don’t have so many proplems…but still.

ICork Floor

3:34 PM

Radiant heating (especially electric) limits your choice of flooring. Most “wood” floors are not allowed over “electric”. That rules out: cork (floating and glue down), laminate, engineered hardwood and vinyl.

I do not allow either of my floors (glue down or floating) over electric in floor heating.

ICork Floor

3:35 PM

If you want to keep the tiles, then you have to FLATTEN them out (sanding and sinking in cement has already been listed). If you want in-floor radiant heat mats, we are limited to: ceramic tile, porcelain tile, concrete and carpet.

Visitor 40616863

3:35 PM

I hear you. I’ve given up on the radiant heat. I”m just trying to figure out if I have a problem putting the floating floor over this ugly ceramic tile. Or whether I’d be better with the non-floating cork.

ICork Floor

3:36 PM

To glue down a cork floor over ceramic tiles = SAND OFF THE FINISH, SINK in cement (cover the entire tile in concrete), allow to dry (a few days) then glue to the concrete.

Visitor 40616863

3:36 PM

Given that I have the ceramic tile am I better off with floating cork tiles or glue down?

ICork Floor

3:37 PM

The least likely to “fail” = floating floor. The ceramic tiles must be FLAT (almost always need sanding) and even. A layer of 3mm cork underlay can help a little bit…but it won’t correct a wobbly floor.

ICork Floor

3:38 PM

Has your installer checked the “level” of the tiles…over the entire surface?

Visitor 40616863

3:41 PM

OK — That really helps.

Can I install cork flooring over a electric matts?

Visitor 40616863

1:53 PM

Just want to confirm that this tile can be used over a heated floor.

1:53 PM

ICork Floor has joined.

ICork Floor

1:54 PM

We allow our cork flooring to be used over in-floor radiant heat that is “hydronic” or “forced air”.

What type of in-floor heating do you have?

Visitor 40616863

1:54 PM

It will be the electric heated matts

ICork Floor

1:55 PM

We prefer not to see our cork tiles/floating floor planks installed over electric matts. They have a long history of over heating = causes damage to adhesives/wood floors.

Where are you planning to install the matts? Kitchen, bathrooms?

Visitor 40616863

1:57 PM

No — It’s a old sunroom. It has ceramic tile now and the matts will go on that and then the floating cork. Advise?

ICork Floor

1:58 PM

This would be an EXTREMELY technical/expensive installation. It would be cheaper/easier to remove the tile, install cork floating flooring and then add cheap baseboard heaters. The cork will become the insulation/warmth you are hoping for from the electric matts.

ICork Floor

1:59 PM

To get this to work, you would need to SINK the tiles in cement, lay the matts/mesh, and then SINK them in cement as well (about an inch) and then we can look at floating a floor over the radiant heat matts.

Visitor 40616863

2:00 PM

OK — I really appreciate the info and glad we clarified the situation. I am assuming I can still install the cork over the ceramic floor if I don’t put in the heated floor? Ripping up this ceramic is very expensive and messy.

ICork Floor

2:01 PM

The floating floor can be installed over the tiles…SO LONG AS IT IS FLAT and EVEN (that means you need to leveling uneven tiles and get rid of grout lines AND smooth out the floor)..

ICork Floor

2:02 PM

I’ve seen contractors SAND DOWN uneven ceramic tiles and then fill the grout with concrete (sink it in cement) and that has worked. It was more expensive than removing the tiles.

ICork Floor

2:03 PM

The going rate to remove tile (in my area) = $1-$2/sf.

Visitor 40616863

2:03 PM

Floor is flat and in great shape. Is it possible to get this exchange sent to me in email so I can show my contractor?

ICork Floor

2:04 PM

The “flat” means it has to be within the flat allowance: 3mm over 3ft (this causes the “hollow” sound) or for the BEST POSSIBLE option: 3mm over 10ft (floor no longer sounds “hollow” nor does it bounce). Subfloor prep is EVERYTHING.

I can send a transcript to your email.

Have you received samples?

Visitor 40616863

2:06 PM

That would be great. I had friend who had this same tile removed and it took a jackhammer and made a huge mess despite elaborate screening and other measures. I did get the samples and really like the Walnut Burlwood.

ICork Floor

2:07 PM

The Walnut Burlwood is STUNNING!

ICork Floor

2:10 PM

The radiant heating systems are often more expensive than a nice baseboard heater. The cork acts as the “keep my feet and legs warm” product as well as insulating. It is cheaper to heat a space from INSIDE the space when using cork. If you try to heat “through” cork you will find it takes more energy (read: more expensive) to get the room up to temperature.

 

Installation Cork Glue Down Tiles in a Basement Bathroom and Laundry Room

Visitor 84524247

12:24 PM

We are working on a basement bath and laundry room remodel, could I put cork glue down tiles on both rooms and laundry?

ICork Customer Service

12:25 PM

Basements = floating floor…but NOT in a bathroom

Laundry rooms = glue down floor…but NOT in a basement.

You can see how this is going to get “tough”.

Visitor 84524247

12:25 PM

Why not in the bath? Also we have radiant floor heat on part but not all of the basement. Laundry is old concrete, bath is radiant

ICork Customer Service

12:25 PM

Bathrooms (with tub or shower) = glue down tiles but NOT in a bathroom

ICork Customer Service

12:26 PM

A glue down cork floor is the requirement for bathrooms and laundry rooms except for ONE single problem…it cannot be installed below grade (basements).

Visitor 84524247

12:27 PM

Hmm, other companies do not state this.

ICork Customer Service

12:28 PM

The adhesives used to glue down cork do NOT like slabs nor moisture normally found in slabs. We are a cork specialist = we are THE specialists in this area.

ICork Customer Service

12:29 PM

I’ve had many cork floors “ruined” because “other companies” are unaware of cork as a ‘specialty product’.

Visitor 84524247

12:30 PM

OK, I get the glue down doesn’t work, but cannot for the life of me see why floating floors wouldn’t work especially if you laid a vapor barrier between the slab and floating floor.

ICork Customer Service

12:31 PM

A floating floor has a middle layer made up of HDF (high density fibre board). The HDF is susceptible to HUMIDITY in full bathrooms.

A shower or bath will throw off 100% humidity every time. Over time the middle HDF layer will slowly swell. As it swells it deteriorates. In a bathroom used on a daily basis, we expect the floor to require replacement inside of 7 years.

ICork Customer Service

12:33 PM

I’ve seen “torlys” and “wicanders” floating floors require replacement inside of 5 years…despite the companies claiming “moisture resistant HDF core”. It is the same reason a laminate floating floor cannot be installed in bathrooms.

ICork Customer Service

12:34 PM

To glue down a cork floor in a basement takes plenty of effort. We’ve had people use the Ditra roll-on membrane and then cover it with self-levelling compound (SLC). They have then glued the cork to the SLC…we do NOT offer a warranty for this but I’ve heard it works. Some customers used Wakol PU 280 (moisture barrier) to block the moisture from below before apply D3540

12:35 PM

What type of radiant heat is in the bathroom? Electric, hydronic or forced air?

Visitor 84524247

12:36 PM

Not familiar with Torlys or Wicanders, no idea about them. I will add this to the conversation. I have used cork flooring, have it in my photography studio in fact and have left remnants out on our driveway (concrete) for weeks maybe a month or so, rain, sunshine, heat you name and with no deterioration. So I am a bit surprised that you’re telling me a bath or laundry could be dramatically more detrimental area.

ICork Customer Service

12:37 PM

Did you use 100% cork tiles or floating floor?

Visitor 84524247

12:37 PM

Its hydronic for sure, not electric

Visitor 84524247

12:38 PM

It is floating floor. I have used cork wall tiles in the basement though not a laundry or bath with no problems.

ICork Customer Service

12:38 PM

That’s a little easier to handle. Of course you are welcome to do as you wish. It is your home. I will not offer warranty. I can at least offer you the best possible installation technique but no warranty.

ICork Customer Service

12:39 PM

cork wall tiles = 100% cork glued in place to drywall or some other “board” product = permanent product.

ICork Customer Service

12:40 PM

Cork wall tiles glued to MASONRY below grade = falls off the wall inside of 3 months (we’ve just had someone do this…they didn’t prime the masonry prior to the project).

Visitor 84524247

12:41 PM

No I wouldn’t glue it to masonry. We have sprayed foam insulation around the perimeter, with OSB attached to the firring studs, then blue board drywall over that.

ICork Customer Service

12:41 PM

Cork loves blue board drywall…or the adhesive does anyway.

Visitor 84524247

12:42 PM

Also we live in MT, not WA or the coastal areas. It is much drier here.

ICork Customer Service

12:42 PM

Yes…I understand. The humidity is not from the “outside air” it is from the shower. Again, you are welcome to do as you will. I will choose to remove warranty.

Visitor 84524247

12:44 PM

I was referring to seepage of humidity through the concrete slabs or walls, not the humidity from the shower/bath. But understood, thanks for your time.

ICork Customer Service

12:44 PM

Have fun.

Can cork floating flooring install over terracotta floor?

 

Can you float the autumn leaves cork floating floor over terracotta flooring?

1:30 PM

ICork Floor has joined.

ICork Floor

1:31 PM

So long as the terracotta floor is BONE FLAT, you can install a floating floor over top.

I suggest looking at cork underlay if you are installing over top of an old floor.

Visitor 48803763

1:31 PM

  1. Can you recommend the right cork overlay for that product?

sorry underlay

ICork Floor

1:31 PM

A natural stone/tile product like terracotta normally has to be A) ripped out or B) sanded flat

Visitor 48803763

1:32 PM

  1. thank you. what underlay would you recommend for autumn leaves cork floor

ICork Floor

1:32 PM

Terracotta is a B**** to lay over top of. It is wavy and uneven.

Visitor 48803763

1:32 PM

hee hee… thank you for the heads up

Visitor 48803763

1:33 PM

it’s going into a music store and they don’t want hard flooring for sound control

ICork Floor

1:33 PM

The cork underlay will be up to you to decide. The floor heights of the rest of the home will determine what can and cannot be done.

In a commercial setting = remove the terracotta.

Visitor 48803763

1:33 PM

  1. thank you.

ICork Floor

1:34 PM

A commercial setting really needs proper floor preparation. Once the tile is removed I would use 6mm cork underlay for acoustics.

Visitor 48803763

1:34 PM

  1. Thank you very much.

What adhesive should I use to install cork wall tiles in a hot yoga studio ?

Visitor 10076104

5:12 PM

Hell…I am opening a bikram hot yoga studio and am interested in using the golden beach cork wall tile for my back wall in the “hot room”…approx 385 sq ft. 43’x8’7”. It will be applied to a sheet rock wall.

5:12 PM

ICork Floor has joined.

ICork Floor

5:13 PM

A hot room install requires specific/expensive adhesive (3M 30NF Green Fastbond Contact Adhesive). It is very expensive and only available to contractors.

Needless to say, this is “doable” price of Wakol D3540 cork adhesive.

Visitor 10076104

5:15 PM

so now it becomes a contractor job and not a “do it yourself” type job?

ICork Floor

5:16 PM

The adhesive required = $180/gallon and it is hard to source. A contractor or someone in the trades will have access to it without too much effort. Once you have the materials, you are welcome to try to use the adhesive.

Visitor 10076104

5:17 PM

Lol…that doesn’t sound too user friendly…am I right to assume that in this circumstance??

ICork Floor

5:17 PM

The problem is not the “wall cork” the problem is the “hot studio”. Special adhesives are required so it doesn’t melt.

The “hot” is the issue.

Visitor 10076104

5:17 PM

ok…its for a wall…not a floor…same circumstance??

ICork Floor

5:17 PM

Yep…same “heat” = same problem.

Visitor 10076104

5:19 PM

ok…just didn’t know if bodies weren’t against it if the same circumstances applied….thanks for your time…glad I asked you first.

ICork Floor

5:19 PM

Most adhesives melt at 85 F. A hot yoga studio can get into the ’90’s. The need for a heat resistant glue is huge.

I’m glad you asked as well. We hate to see problems with our product.

What is the best underlayment for my basement?

Hi I just purchased some floating cork floating flooring for a below grade living room to go over a concrete slab. my question is regarding the underlayment. there are some 6mil poly options for vapor (~$0.14/sqft), and some 3 in 1 underlayment’s that offer additional thermal protection (~$0.55/sqft). I don’t think I have to have the extra protection, but my question is: 1) can I even use a 3in1 with a floating floor that has the integrated cork underlayment? and 2) would the extra thermal protection be helpful?

3:52 PM

ICork Floor has joined.

ICork Floor

3:53 PM

The most effective “vapour” barrier = the basic 6mil poly sheeting sealed with red duct tape for a grand total of $0.20/sf ($0.11/sf for the plastic…and $0.10/sf for the tape).

I find the 3-in-1 are expensive, over hyped “vapour barriers” that have a small amount of thermal benefit.

ICork Floor

3:54 PM

If you wish to spend a few more cents, then I recommend working with our 3mm cork underlay ($0.35/sf). It will offer 2-3 times the thermal benefit of the 3-in-1 AND it is still cheaper.

ICork Floor

3:55 PM

If you are in a “warm” are of N. America and do not need the extra bit of thermal insulation, you are welcome to install that floating floor straight over the vapour barrier.

If you are looking to increase the efficiency of your HVAC system, the 3mm cork is a nice addition in a regular home. If you are looking for extra thermal or extra acoustic insulation, then the “big boy” = 6mm cork underlay.

Visitor 19575119

3:57 PM

the flooring I bought is cork and has I believed 3mm of cork on the top and 3mm of cork on the bottom

ICork Floor

3:58 PM

Do you feel you need more warmth?

Visitor 19575119

3:59 PM

well the existing floor is engineered oak, has no underlayment and is fairly cold, so its hard for me to judge what else I need

ICork Floor

3:59 PM

Are you leaving the oak in place?

Visitor 19575119

3:59 PM

no

ICork Floor

3:59 PM

You are removing the oak and exposing the concrete? Correct?

Visitor 19575119

4:00 PM

it had no moisture barrier and experienced some warping. I’m

 removing all the existing wood and glue

ICork Floor

4:00 PM

Got it. If your wood floor is COLD then you have thermal insulation issues. Wood floors are traditionally much warmer than anything else (other than cork).

ICork Floor

4:01 PM

Personally, I think you can happily add in 3mm cork underlay to achieve a very nice, warm floor. How cold does it get where you live?

Visitor 19575119

4:02 PM

I live in washington dc, so it is below freezing for 3-4 months

ICork Floor

4:02 PM

If you have a cold wood floor, you have a cold slab. The more cork you can use the more fuel efficient your heating in the winter and cooling in the summer.

ICork Floor

4:03 PM

I wouldn’t waste my time with a 3-in-1. A 3mm cork underlay over top of the plastic = more effective and cheaper. I would prefer to see 6mm. That with the cork floating floor = 12 deg F INCREASE in room temperature…without your heating system doing anything more than it is doing right now.

ICork Floor

4:04 PM

That means you can REDUCE your thermostat and still maintain a comfortable temperature in the room.

ICork Floor

4:05 PM

I’ve had Canadians use the 6mm cork underlay + floating cork in basements that see -40 C (same as -40 F). They have to turn down their heater to watch TV in the basement. The basement is now the warmest and quietest spot in the house. So much so it is now the local “teen” hangout…’cause no one can hear them.

 

Visitor 19575119

4:06 PM

ok, thanks for your help

ICork Floor

4:06 PM

No problem…have fun.

 

Can I install a Snapstone Porcelain tile with cork underlayment?

Visitor 25301318

11:22 AM

I’m new to this…I’m looking to install a Snapstone Porcelain tile 6×24 plank style tiles. Its in a condo so I need to increase the sound proofing from its 58stc to 72 stc…they say it can be used with a rolling cork underlay, but not one used for laminate…do you have something like that?

Condo has a concrete slab

11:22 AM

ICork Floor

11:22 AM

Your condo building is a bit “odd” in their request. Cork is cork.

ICork Floor

11:23 AM

You need to FIRST find out if the Snapstone Porcelain tile is ALLOWED an underlay. Most do not. If you have the make (name/brand of product) I can investigate the installation instructions.

ICork Floor

11:25 AM

Let’s pretend this is allowed (I’m pretty sure it is not…but let’s pretend), the “go-to” cork underlay = 6mm thickness. This normally increases the acoustic rating of the floor by 23 dB. If your tile is offering 58 STC you can add 23 dB to that = 81 dB.

Normally these “big juicy” numbers are hard to achieve. They rely HEAVILY on the THICKNESS of your concrete. How thick is your concrete slab?

Visitor 25301318

11:26 AM

Not sure 6″ or 8″…the condo association requires an stc of 72 for any new flooring.

ICork Floor

11:27 AM

I would assume any “new” flooring excludes carpet…’cause carpet doesn’t offer a rating (there are no testing requirements for carpet).

Visitor 25301318

11:27 AM

Are you familiar with snapstone? Its for diy idiots like me.

ICork Floor

11:28 AM

An 8″ slab can achieve 72 dB with 1/2″ cork underlay. I’m investigating Snapstone and there is NO indication that anything other than concrete/plywood is allowed. Please wait while I investigate.

Visitor 25301318

11:28 AM

It has a rubberish base in a tray, but if you add to much elasticity then the whole system gets shot up and the tile’s crack.

ICork Floor

11:29 AM

You will need to call them on their assistance hot line. I would bet dollars to donuts you CANNOT use an underpad/underlay other than concrete or plywood. Flexion = bad. Cork = mild/moderate flexion.

ICork Floor

11:30 AM

I would look to something else. You will almost never achieve 72 STC with anything other than 1/2″ cork underlay + solid flooring. I would say 99% of all vinyl floors CANNOT handle cork. These Snapstone tiles = single family homes only. Condo boards don’t like them because of the noise complaints.

ICork Floor

11:31 AM

To install this with the REQUIRED STC of 72 you would spend 3x the amount of money/time to get this done than a nice “engineered” hardwood would cost with 1/2″ cork underlay.

Visitor 25301318

11:31 AM

It DOES work with the cork that you can “roll” on home depots website according them, but the thickness is 1/4″ inch and rolls and goes with ceramic tile installs. However, they said the one the rolls…they didn’t mention a thickness

ICork Floor

11:32 AM

Home Depot cork is tested using: 10″ concrete slab + 1/2″ flooring + 12″ drop down ACOUSTIC ceiling STUFFED with acoustic insulation. You would have to buy your downstairs neighbor a $10,000 acoustic ceiling!

ICork Floor

11:33 AM

Don’t believe advertised numbers for STC/IIC ratings. They are often bogus.

Snapstone has the same limitations as COREtech vinyl = 1/4″ cork is the MOST you can use. That offers 8 dB of acoustics. You won’t make it.

Visitor 25301318

11:34 AM

Any thoughts on rubber underlay?

ICork Floor

11:34 AM

Rubber underlay is WORSE for your floor.

Visitor 25301318

11:34 AM

or a whispermat?

ICork Floor

11:35 AM

Whispermat = bogus testing results = same as the tests used for the HD 1/4″ cork results.

ICork Floor

11:36 AM

You have to use what the manufacturer ALLOWS! That’s all you are allowed. Please call them to find out their MAXIMUM CORK thickness.

Visitor 25301318

11:37 AM

which one of your corks falls in that category so I can ask them?

ICork Floor

11:37 AM

If you REALLY want this floor and you INSIST on the install with acoustic underlay, then here is what you are going to do: 1) mortar/glue 1/2″ cork in place…allow glue to cure; 2) Sink cork in concrete levelling compound and let cure; 3) install floor over top.

ICork Floor

11:38 AM

Most cork = sheets of 2ft x 3ft. We offer 3mm (1/8″) and 6mm (1/4″). We do not carry the 1/2″ thickness that you would need for a 6″ concrete slab. I must correct myself. Coretech requires 1/8″ cork as the maximum.

ICork Floor

11:39 AM

To cement the cork to the concrete = $3-$5/sf for labour and materials….then add the cost of Snapstone + labour costs. It is a very expensive installation.

Visitor 25301318

11:40 AM

No labor costs…just me.

ICork Floor

11:40 AM

Only highly trained tile setters know how to sink cork into cement.

ICork Floor

11:41 AM

Please call Snapstone.

Visitor 25301318

11:41 AM

which is why regular porcelain is sounding like a great idea again. Do you have an email for follow-up after I talk to snapstone?

ICork Floor

11:43 AM

You will have the same issues with porcelain tiles for areas other than kitchen and baths. Condos do NOT want to see loud floors in “living rooms”, “hallways” or “bedrooms”. These loud floors are allowed in very limited sections = baths, entrance and kitchens. You will have the SAME issues with all porcelain install. They will still want to see a high STC number.

Visitor 25301318

11:44 AM

If the STC Whisper Mat or whatever says 72 that’s all they require…sadly.

ICork Floor

11:44 AM

Porcelain can achieve STC 72 with 1/2″ cork sunk in concrete (see explanation above). A floating “solid” floor (like engineered hardwood, laminate, cork or bamboo) have the cheapest install options = loose lay sheets of cork and then click the floor together over top.

ICork Floor

11:45 AM

Whisper Mat was recorded over a 12″ drop down acoustic ceiling = not a real-life situation. They puff their numbers to increase sales…still have plenty of noise complaints afterwards.

You can email us at: https://www.cancork.com/contact-us/

 

Visitor 25301318

11:46 AM

thanks.

ICork Floor

11:46 AM

Good luck.

Visitor 25301318

11:47 AM

apparently I need it.

ICork Floor

11:48 AM

😉 I see it all the time…that’s why I’m so “good” at the acoustic/STC rating stuff. I’ve been investigating this stuff for 4+ years. Don’t feel bad. Even industry insiders don’t know this stuff.